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100 SAT Words Beginning with "E"

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جستجو

 

·  ebullient

joyously unrestrained

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

The piece opened with ebullient bursts of energy and color that scampered over harmonica drones played by one or more members.
New York Times (May 10, 2010)

 

·  eclectic

selecting what seems best of various styles or ideas

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

A former student of fine art, Mr Scruff's eclectic selections are accompanied by animations of the trademark "potato people" who humorously narrate his musical journey.
The Guardian (Aug 13, 2011)

 

·  edible

suitable for use as food

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

Nevertheless, hunger increased so much that many ventured out into woods along the river seeking edible roots, and with some success.
Spears, John R.

 

·  edify

make understand

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

Then Miss Fairbairn held one of her little discourses, with which now and then she endeavoured to edify her pupils.
Warner, Susan

 

·  efface

remove by or as if by rubbing or erasing

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

Her rich beauty was wiped out as an acid-soaked sponge might efface a portrait.
Terhune, Albert Payson

 

·  effervescent

marked by high spirits or excitement

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

When he ran for president, Barack Obama's effervescent campaign was about hope, optimism, national unity, and, above all, the future.
Newsweek (May 17, 2010)

 

·  effulgent

radiating or as if radiating light

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

Ere another year be passed, we hope to see its effulgent rays light up all the dark corners of our land.
Cutter, Orlando P.

 

·  egalitarian

favoring social equality

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

“We are living in an egalitarian society where everyone is equal,” he said.
BusinessWeek (Dec 2, 2011)

 

·  egotistical

characteristic of those having an inflated idea of their own importance

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

I have lived an entirely egotistical life, for myself alone.
The Guardian (Jan 3, 2011)

 

·  egregious

conspicuously and outrageously bad or reprehensible

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

“His comments were so egregious, naturally advertisers will have doubts about being associated with Limbaugh’s brand of hate,” Mr. Boehlert said in an e-mail message.
New York Times (Mar 5, 2012)

 

·  elated

full of high-spirited delight

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

Young Barry returned from his parting walk with his brother in high spirits, elated with hope, and better both in mind and body.
Cobbold, Richard

 

·  eloquent

expressing yourself readily, clearly, effectively

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

But, so far as the best selection of words, the clearest style, the most coherent and convincing argument can constitute eloquence, Mill's speeches are eloquent.
McCarthy, Justin

 

·  elucidate

make clear and (more) comprehensible

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

Improving the understanding of why tissues in bar-headed geese are so adept at taking up oxygen might elucidate human respiration as well.
Scientific American (Nov 5, 2011)

 

·  elude

escape, either physically or mentally

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

Gregory Standifer was arrested at the scene after allegedly attempting to elude police by jumping out of a window, police said.
Chicago Tribune (Sep 4, 2011)

 

·  elusive

skillful at eluding capture

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

They are an elusive lot and Don Ramon would soon wear out his troops hunting them in the bush.
Bindloss, Harold

 

·  emancipate

free from slavery or servitude

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

The Civil War came to an end, leaving the slave not only emancipated but endowed with the full dignity of citizenship.
Elliott, Maud Howe

 

·  embellish

make more attractive by adding ornament, colour, etc.

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

At Saks, reedy shapes and flared minis, and more vanguard looks like Marc Jacobs’s sports-inspired skirts embellished with a racing stripe, are projected best sellers.
New York Times (Mar 21, 2012)

 

·  embody

represent in bodily form

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

He was a can-do optimist who, despite many years in the environs of Hollywood, identified with and embodied American values.
New York Times (Jan 29, 2012)

 

·  embryonic

of an organism prior to birth or hatching

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

Human embryonic stem cells typically come from fertilized eggs.
Scientific American (Nov 4, 2011)

 

·  eminent

standing above others in quality or position

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

The daring aviator was heartily congratulated again by the President and other eminent men who thronged about him.
Galbreath, C. B. (Charles Burleigh)

 

·  emphatic

forceful and definite in expression or action

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

Miss Penny repeated my question in her loud, emphatic voice.
Huxley, Aldous

 

·  empirical

derived from experiment and observation rather than theory

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

"So far, no one has reported empirical evidence from real city-traffic data that the transition Kerner predicted actually occurs," Davis pointed out.
US News (Oct 18, 2011)

 

·  emulate

strive to equal or match, especially by imitating

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

People in the technology field described Mr. Jobs as someone they could only look up to — and try to emulate.
New York Times (Oct 6, 2011)

 

·  enamor

attract; cause to be enamored

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

Not long ago I fell in love, But unreturned is my affection— The girl that I'm enamored of Pays little heed in my direction.
Morley, Christopher

 

·  encumber

hold back

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

Two others were making slower progress for the reason that each was encumbered by supporting a disabled man.
Westerman, Percy F. (Percy Francis)

 

·  endearing

lovable especially in a childlike or naive way

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

“They have goofy and lovable personalities that are incredibly endearing,” she said.
New York Times (Nov 23, 2011)

 

·  endeavor

attempt by employing effort

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

A few men endeavored to win popularity by pursuing a few others, and thus far they have been conspicuous failures.
Ingersoll, Robert Green

 

·  endemic

of or relating to a disease (or anything resembling a disease) constantly present to greater or lesser extent in a particular locality

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

An endemic disease, due to local causes and spreading by intercommunication.
Various

 

·  enigma

something that baffles understanding and cannot be explained

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

Tails are often an enigma; many creatures have them, but scientists know little about their function, particularly for extinct species.
Science Magazine (Jan 4, 2012)

 

·  enmity

a state of deep-seated ill-will

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

He looked at the young man with enmity, while his face every day grew harder, more angry, and stern, like iron.
Lathrop, George Parsons

 

·  ennui

the feeling of being bored by something tedious

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

“You are in the Land of Pleasure, and in yonder castle lives a horrid Giant called Ennui, who bores everybody he catches to death.”
Taylor, Bert Leston

 

·  enthrall

hold spellbound

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

But despite the bottomless spate of new "Housewives" series that Bravo keeps trotting out, the "Real Housewives" franchise still fascinates and enthralls me.
Salon (Oct 4, 2010)

 

·  entice

provoke someone to do something through (often false or exaggerated) promises or persuasion

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

My new acquisition, "Boy," insisted on being petted, and his winning and enticing ways are irresistible.
Bird, Isabella L. (Isabella Lucy)

 

·  entomology

the branch of zoology that studies insects

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

From the department of entomology you expect to learn something about the troublesome insects, which are so universal an annoyance.
Latham, A. W.

 

·  entreat

ask for or request earnestly

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

"Let me go now, please," she entreated, her eyes unable to meet his any longer.
Hope, Anthony

 

·  entrepreneur

someone who organizes a business venture and assumes the risk for it

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

Mr. Boehner said it would be “good news for entrepreneurs and aspiring small businesspeople struggling to overcome government barriers to job creation.”
New York Times (Apr 6, 2012)

 

·  enumerate

determine the number or amount of

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

The houses in this street are not enumerated beyond forty-five, all told. 
Allbut, Robert

 

·  enunciate

express or state clearly

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

On the second floor, kindergarten children stand together in a circle, clapping while learning how to enunciate different words.
New York Times (Dec 31, 2011)

 

·  ephemeral

anything short-lived, as an insect that lives only for a day in its winged form

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

Such larger political structures as the tyrants of Syracuse built up by the subjugation of other cities were purely ephemeral, barely outliving their founders.
Boak, Arthur Edward Romilly

 

·  epiphany

a divine manifestation

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

But at least he's acting as the father of his child, and that, rather than any epiphany or miraculous transformation, is the point.
Salon (Dec 21, 2010)

 

·  epitome

a standard or typical example

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

Ms. Netrebko, in particular, riveted all eyes and ears, the epitome of star-crossed glamour in her black bob and sick-rose-red cocktail dress.
New York Times (Dec 26, 2010)

 

·  epoch

a period marked by distinctive character or reckoned from a fixed point or event

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

The best authorities put the climax of the last glacial epoch between twenty-five and thirty thousand years ago.
Huntington, Ellsworth

 

·  equestrian

of or relating to or featuring horseback riding

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

While some racehorses peak in their younger years and move on to breeding, equestrian horses tend to be older and require complex training.
Seattle Times (Jan 20, 2012)

 

·  equitable

fair to all parties as dictated by reason and conscience

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

I suggested, as a more equitable adjustment, an equal division of profits; and to that Mr. Gye at last agreed.
Mapleson, James H.

 

·  equivocate

be deliberately ambiguous or unclear in order to mislead or withhold information

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

Beaten in the open field, the church began to equivocate, to evade, and to give new meanings to inspired words.
Ingersoll, Robert Green

 

·  eradicate

kill in large numbers

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

Some people are misusing poisonous chemicals in a desperate bid to eradicate the pests, federal officials said Thursday.
New York Times (Sep 23, 2011)

 

·  erode

become ground down or deteriorate

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi lost his absolute majority in the Italian parliament in a vote today on last year’s budget, further eroding his authority.
BusinessWeek (Nov 8, 2011)

 

·  erratic

liable to sudden unpredictable change

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

The U.S. officials stressed that North Korea’s past behavior has been notoriously erratic, making predictions about its intentions difficult.
Washington Post (Dec 19, 2011)

 

·  erudite

having or showing profound knowledge

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

In countless deft, darting, erudite essays, it has enabled him to explain the unexpected continuities and awkward breaks of literary history.
The Guardian (Jul 4, 2010)

 

·  eschew

avoid and stay away from deliberately; stay clear of

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

Vegans eschew all animal products, including dairy and eggs, so their iodine sources may be few.
Reuters (Jan 17, 2012)

 

·  esoteric

confined to and understandable by only an enlightened inner circle

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

But researchers can get lost in their genius, drilling into ever more esoteric questions.
Scientific American (Feb 7, 2012)

 

·  etymology

a history of a word

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

Its “suggested” etymology or word origin is Latin serpens meaning “a snake” and French sortir meaning “come out of, to leave.”
New York Times (May 17, 2010)

 

·  euphemism

an inoffensive or indirect expression that is substituted for one that is considered offensive or too harsh

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

It is an oddly polite term—a euphemism—that conceals varying degrees of fear, loathing, and admiration.
New York Times (Mar 30, 2010)

 

·  euphoria

a feeling of great (usually exaggerated) elation

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

Popular euphoria and joy at their leaders' departure has given way to frustration, grievance and fear.
Reuters (Dec 22, 2011)

 

·  evanescent

tending to vanish like vapor

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

Time seems stopped but it is moving on, and every glimmer of light is evanescent, flitting.
The Guardian (Apr 15, 2010)

 

·  evasive

deliberately vague or ambiguous

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

I anticipated finding them deceitful and evasive: furtive people, wandering in devious ways and disappearing into mysterious houses, at dead of night.
Street, Julian

 

·  evince

give expression to

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

Together, the performers evince an easy, humorous energy, like affectionate but mischievous siblings.
New York Times (Mar 16, 2012)

 

·  evoke

call forth (emotions, feelings, and responses)

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

Tropical fish tanks in restaurants, hospitals and homes evoke feelings of tranquility and beauty.
Scientific American (Apr 6, 2012)

 

·  evolve

undergo development or evolution

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

In its 166+ year history, Scientific American has changed and evolved in different directions many times.
Scientific American (Apr 2, 2012)

 

·  exacerbate

make worse

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

Politicians have argued that further austerity will only exacerbate the country's economic death spiral by deepening its worse than expected recession.
The Guardian (Feb 12, 2012)

 

·  exalt

fill with sublime emotion

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

But this woman's beauty was glorified by eyes that spoke of exalted thoughts, passionate longings, lofty emotions.
Hocking, Joseph

 

·  excavate

recover through digging

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

With many of Caligula's monuments destroyed after he was killed by his Praetorian guard at 28, archaeologists are eager to excavate for his remains.
The Guardian (Jan 17, 2011)

 

·  excoriate

express strong disapproval of

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

The landlord had another excoriating remark, which he might have flung at the young man and finished him up, but he magnanimously forbore.
Bouton, John Bell

 

·  exculpate

pronounce not guilty of criminal charges

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

Stepan did not try to exculpate himself, and bore patiently his sentence which was three days in the punishment-cell, and after that solitary confinement.
Tolstoy, Leo, graf

 

·  execrate

curse or declare to be evil or anathema or threaten with divine punishment

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

Even the crimes of monsters, whom we execrate, are to be traced to madness and intoxication, more than to natural fierceness and wickedness.
Lord, John

 

·  exemplify

clarify by giving an example of

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

He brought up reality television — specifically, the garish sort of reality exemplified by Bravo’s “Real Housewives” steamroller.
New York Times (Aug 27, 2011)

 

·  exhort

force or impel in an indicated direction

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

A proclamation was put up on shore, exhorting the people to keep quiet, attend to their avocations, and bring in presents as obedient subjects.
Lindley, Augustus F.

 

·  existential

relating to or dealing with existence (especially with human existence)

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

Jindal, by contrast, has treated the spill as an existential threat, saying repeatedly that what's at stake "is a way of life for us."
Washington Post (May 18, 2010)

 

·  exodus

a journey by a large group to escape from a hostile environment

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

It said the flight of Christians to other parts of Iraq and abroad has become "a slow but steady exodus".
BBC (Dec 17, 2010)

 

·  exonerate

pronounce not guilty of criminal charges

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

“He was, if not exonerated, never proven guilty,” Elizabeth Hecht said in an interview on Thursday.
New York Times (Feb 10, 2012)

 

·  exorbitant

greatly exceeding bounds of reason or moderation

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

Rents are exorbitant; but ordinary living and bad liquors are cheap.
Whymper, Frederick

 

·  expatiate

add details, as to an account or idea; clarify the meaning of and discourse in a learned way, usually in writing

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

He then expatiated on his own miseries, which he detailed at full length.
Manzoni, Alessandro

 

·  expatriate

a person who is voluntarily absent from home or country

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

She and Jack Hemingway, also known as Bumby, were toddlers at the time, living with their expatriate American parents in Paris.
New York Times (Mar 31, 2012)

 

·  expectation

anticipating with confidence of fulfillment

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

Every plan had proved abortive, every expectation been disappointed.
Headley, Joel Tyler

 

·  expectorate

discharge (phlegm or sputum) from the lungs and out of the mouth

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

No, they don't care to go, expectorating the tobacco juice from their mouths into the fire at the same time.
Various

 

·  expedient

a means to an end; not necessarily a principled or ethical one

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

In his youth he had apparently settled the problem once for all; but the solution then found was scarcely more than a temporary expedient.
Chinard, Gilbert

 

·  expedite

process fast and efficiently

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

First-class customers generally have access to priority check-in and boarding, expedited baggage service and faster security lines at some airports.
BusinessWeek (Aug 4, 2011)

 

·  expenditure

money paid out; an amount spent

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

Unless income also rises — which isn’t happening for many people now — higher fuel costs will eventually displace other expenditures.
New York Times (Mar 3, 2012)

 

·  expiate

make amends for

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

Yes, I was so far guilty, and I make the confession in hopes that some portion of my errors may be expiated by repentance.
Various

 

·  explicit

precisely and clearly expressed or readily observable; leaving nothing to implication

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

Just as medical researchers once uncovered the link between cigarettes and lung cancer, researchers are now making the explicit connection between air pollution and asthma.
Time (Mar 29, 2012)

 

·  exploitation

an act that exploits or victimizes someone (treats them unfairly)

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

But this profit rested on intensive exploitation and domination: whole families worked in the mills, including children.
Salon (Feb 17, 2011)

 

·  expository

serving to expound or set forth

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

"Several characters are required to make long expository speeches in which the play's themes are clumsily disclosed."
The Guardian (Feb 24, 2011)

 

·  expulsion

the act of forcing out someone or something

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

“She is very near expulsion, not suspension,” said the principal, gravely.
Morrison, Gertrude W.

 

·  expunge

remove by erasing or crossing out or as if by drawing a line

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

If he stays out of a trouble for a year the incident will be expunged from his record.
Seattle Times (Aug 4, 2010)

 

·  exquisite

delicately beautiful

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

Constance lifted up her exquisite voice untiringly, weaving her magic spell about her eager listeners.
Lester, Pauline

 

·  extant

still in existence; not extinct or destroyed or lost

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

She then wrote her last will, which is still extant, and consists of four pages, closely written, in a neat, firm hand.
Goodrich, Samuel G. (Samuel Griswold)

 

·  extemporaneous

with little or no preparation or forethought

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

His friends sometimes held an extemporaneous concert in his room, without preparation, programme, or audience.
Various

 

·  extend

stretch out over a distance, space, time, or scope; run or extend between two points or beyond a certain point

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

One map showed a runway system extending across 140 square meters and including 12 underground burrows.
Martin, Edwin P.

 

·  extension

a mutually agreed delay in the date set for the completion of a job or payment of a debt

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

Chalk River’s license expired last year, but it was given a single five-year extension; the Dutch reactor’s lifetime is less certain but also limited.
New York Times (Feb 7, 2012)

 

·  extirpate

destroy completely, as if down to the roots

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

The last wolf was killed in Great Britain two hundred years ago, and the bear was extirpated from that island still earlier.
Marsh, George P.

 

·  extol

praise, glorify, or honor

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

How I praised the duck at that first dinner, and extolled Madame's skill in cookery!
Warren, Arthur

 

·  extort

obtain by coercion or intimidation

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

An instrument of torture for the leg, formerly used to extort confessions, particularly in Scotland.
Webster, Noah

 

·  extraneous

not pertinent to the matter under consideration

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

As a general rule, he explained, rulings other than the one being honored had been removed as extraneous.
Slate (Feb 22, 2012)

 

·  extrapolate

draw from specific cases for more general cases

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

Earlier studies, extrapolating from recessions in the 1970s and 1980s, found larger effects.
BusinessWeek (Feb 27, 2012)

 

·  extricate

release from entanglement of difficulty

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

There was a prickly pear on top, the thorns of which caught him so that at first he could not extricate himself.
Reed, Helen Leah

 

·  extrinsic

not forming an essential part of a thing or arising or originating from the outside

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

There are no external or extrinsic influences—resulting from weariness or interruption.
Hamilton, Clayton Meeker

 

·  extrovert

(psychology) a person concerned more with practical realities than with inner thoughts and feelings

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

The extrovert is the typical active; always leaning out of the window and setting up contacts with the outside world.
Underhill, Evelyn

 

·  exuberant

joyously unrestrained

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

All these prose works were marked by an exuberant, vivid, poetic, impassioned style.
Lowell, James Russell

 

·  exude

make apparent by one's mood or behavior

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

Rizzo said many prospects exude outward confidence but lack it inwardly.
New York Times (Mar 3, 2012)

 

·  exult

feel extreme happiness or elation

EXAMPLE SENTENCE:

Like a soldier going into battle, exulted and fired by a high and lofty purpose, his heart sang within him.
Standish, Burt L.



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